MVZ Community

Sign up for the MVZ Newsletter
 
Loading

 Feb 12, 2018  
MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate: Christopher Martin
MVZ Lunch Seminar - Wed. 14 February, 12-1pm
Photo

Please join us for MVZ Lunch Seminar this Wednesday, 14 February at 12 pm to hear a talk by our third MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate.

3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, Grinnell-Miller Libraryplease let the receptionist know you are there for the MVZ lunch seminar

Dr. Christopher Martin
Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

"The cryptic origins of evolutionary novelty: from genotype to fitness landscape"

Abstract:
One of the most poorly understood evolutionary processes is the evolution of novelty. How do new species colonize novel ecological niches or begin to use existing structures for novel functions? This talk will explore the complex origins of trophic specialists in a case study for the evolution of novelty in action: scale-eating and molluscivory in Caribbean pupfishes. The answer lies at the intersection of ecological opportunity, performance, complex fitness landscapes, and diverse sources of genetic variation.

See our full seminar schedule here.

 Feb 07, 2018  
MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate: Matthew Fujita
MVZ Lunch Seminar - Wed. 7 February, 12-1pm
Photo

Please join us for MVZ Lunch Seminar today Wednesday, 7 February at 12 pm to hear a talk by our second MVZ/IB Faculty Candidate.

3101 Valley Life Sciences Building, Grinnell-Miller Libraryplease let the receptionist know you are there for the MVZ lunch seminar

Dr. Matthew Fujita
Assistant Professor and Assistant Curator, University of Texas, Arlington

"Biodiversity and Natural History Research in the Genomics Era"

Abstract:
Natural history research is inherently integrative and continues to benefit from advances in data collection technologies and analytical approaches. Today I will talk about how my lab leverages genomics to address questions in biodiversity science, including the systematics of West and Central African reptiles and amphibians and the evolution of frog vision systems. The integration of organismal, field, genomic, and computational approaches has been a guiding ethos in my lab and will continue to provide a foundation as we seek to understand the mechanisms generating the incredible biodiversity of reptiles and amphibians.

See our full seminar schedule here.


View News Archive


Sign up for the MVZ Newsletter